February 24-28

The following few links are all related to Google apps.  They include using various tools in the classroom to video tutorials on how to use them:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/tips-on-how-to-use-google-draw-in-your.html

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/adding-voice-comments-to-google-docs.html

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/5-great-google-drive-video-tutorials.html

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/12-ways-to-leverage-power-of-google.html

This page highlights 3 tools for helping students with the writing process:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/three-new-educational-web-tools-to.html

The next pages are related to video in the classroom:

http://elearninginfographics.com/the-impact-of-video-in-education-infographic/

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/8-good-web-tools-to-create-video.html

These next two sites offer copyright-free  images and web tools for photo editing that do not require software downloads.  This is especially important if you can’t install software or have limited HDD space:

http://www.noupe.com/design/im-free-curated-collections-of-free-commercial-use-photos-no-designer-can-do-without-81338.html

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/6-web-tools-to-edit-pictures-without.html

This page is about using Nearpod in the classroom.  The context here is elementary but it transfers quite easily to high school.  This tool works best in a BYOD setting:

http://corkboardconnections.blogspot.ca/2014/02/nearpod.html

This next page offers a free ebook about the uses of gamification in the classroom:

http://elearningindustry.com/free-ebook-how-gamification-reshapes-learning

For the art teachers, this page demonstrates how Pinterest can be a resource:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/20-great-pinterest-boards-for-art.html

The next few links support teacher development around a variety of topics including e-learning to digital portfolios:

http://elearninginfographics.com/11-things-coaches-can-give-teachers-feedback-on-infographic/

http://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2014/02/23/samr-as-a-framework-for-moving-towards-education-3-0/

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/universal-design-for-learning-guidelines.html

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/flipped-classroom-visually-explained.html

http://www.edudemic.com/50-books-teachers/

More digital story telling using the iPad:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/digital-storytelling-with-ipad.html

I hope these can help you on your journey to becoming a techy teacher!

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The Changing Currency of the Knowledge Economy

Last week I had the good fortune of participating in a teachers conference in Saskatoon that featured two amazing keynotes. They were no other than Pasi Sahlberg and Sir Ken Robinson. Now, if you aren’t somehow connected to education these names might not mean a lot; no matter. In one of the sessions Sir Ken referenced the ” knowledge economy” otherwise known as intellectual capital. He went on to relay how this concept played out in the classroom. What caught my attention most was what was missing. That realization bore the fruit that unfolds in this post. It seemed to me that Sir Ken failed to mention a very important fact to teachers: the currency in the knowledge economy is changing. Very much in fact, and not unlike the way virtual currencies like Bitcoin are changing the monetary economy.
What I’m referring to is the plethora of virtual resources and e-learning opportunities that exist for our students to take advantage of.  Khan Academy, Lynda.com, iTunes U and YouTube have opened the door to learning that can exist out side the classroom.  So too have LMSs (Learning Management Systems) like Canvas, Schoology, Edmodo, Moodle and Blackboard.  This is by no means an exhaustive list, I name them simply to illustrate my point.  We as educators must recognize that we are not, nor should we have to be, the students’ sole source of learning.  In fact, by embracing these new “currencies”, we are enriching our students’ learning experience.  The concept of the “flipped” classroom is a prime example of this model.  In the flipped classroom, students access the learning/lecture portion of a lesson independently via video or virtual classrooms(LMS).  The time in class is then spent engaging in related inquiry, rich discussion or application of the knowledge.  This is just one example of how we can embrace our roles as coaches and facilitators of the learning and let go of the “teacher as knowledge keeper” paradigm.  More importantly, this allows something to happen that we all hope for-students can take responsibility for their own learning.  Remember, this is not the end of teaching but a new beginning for how we teach.  Our students still need our guidance to navigate the complexities of these processes and it is important that we build our capacity within the profession to do so. The digital world offers  great wealth in the “knowledge economy” and just like we need good financial advisors, our students need us to be their advisors in the knowledge transactions they perform.

DanTech February 10-14th

This weeks finds include:

This is a link to  some useful google drive apps:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/three-powerful-google-drive-tools-for.html

For all you math wiz(s), this link describes some popular math-related YouTube channels:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/14-excellent-youtube-math-channels-for.html

If cartography is something your students do, this link will be useful:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/11-good-web-tools-to-create-educational.html

This is a great short piece on how our teaching should transform in the “Google Age”:

http://www.teachthought.com/technology/10-ways-teacher-planning-adjust-google-generation/

This is an infographic highlighting the necessary factors for collaborative learning:

http://elearninginfographics.com/the-4-cs-of-collaborative-learning-infographic/

This link is for an app that allows you to link your iPad to your computer like an interactive whiteboard:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/air-sketch-project-your-drawings-and.html

This page highlights a number of tools that would work well in History/Social studies:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/13-good-social-studies-resources.html

This is  a great collection of educational apps that help locate other educational resources:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/10-great-resources-to-find-educational.html

Finally, this link is to a page about project-based learning-there are some very practical tips:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/the-8-essential-elements-of-project.html

Happy Valentine’s day and enjoy the break!

DanTech Feb 3-7

Here is the collection I gathered this week:

This comes “The Teachers Guide to the Networked Classroom”.  It includes a plethora of digital resources that can be used to create a sharing network within your classes:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/teachers-guide-to-networked-classroom.html

The next link is a top 10 iPad apps.  The context is a 1:1 student/iPad ratio but some of the featured apps are good in any classroom:

http://dedwards.me/2014/02/08/top-10-apps-in-an-established-11-ipad-school/

This is a great info graphic on the digital learning switchover:

http://elearninginfographics.com/the-digital-learning-switchover-infographic/

Finally, this is a great blog that explains ways that even the busiest teachers can learn 21st Century skills:

http://www.edudemic.com/next-gen-skills/

This new format was in response to a colleague who was overwhelmed with the volume of emails I was sending.  I hope this proves useful.