Blended Learning

We live in a society where many things are blended.  Foods, families,technologies, etc.  So why is it that when we talk about blended learning, many teachers become unnerved?  Blended learning is just like it sounds-blending the environments and media in which the learning is constructed.  This infographic gives a great visual representation of what  blended learning really is.  Simply stated blended learning constitutes a combination of face to face and online/offline learning.  While it contains E-learning elements, it is important to differentiate it from E-learning.  The face to face component is a primary function of the blended learning model.  Another advantage is that the model allows for some of the more elementary aspects of the lesson to be tackled outside the domain of the classroom which opens the door for enrichment or application during the contact time.  This model does not seek to replace teachers, rather quite the contrary.  The blended learning model is designed to make teacher student interaction more meaningful.  There is no doubt however, that this model can be used to help students who have other commitments that might keep them out of a traditional classroom setting.  In fact, a current example of this is happening in our own division right now at City Park Collegiate.  It is important to note that this model can help students who struggle in the classroom setting but it requirescommitted, self-directed, competent individuals to generate success.  I have some experience employing this model and suggest that as an educator, you must be flexible with your time.  The online component of these types of courses may require that you answer questions outside of “normal” classroom hours.  Like every teaching strategy, this model might not be for you.  Then again, it just might be…